Digital Commonwealth – A great Digital Storytelling Project

On Friday, the video below arrived. It’s the documentary film about the Digital Commonwealth project. If you missed it, Digital Commonwealth was a Big Lottery-funded initiative, led by the University of West of Scotland designed to use the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow as a hook to get ordinary people to use digital technologies to tell their own stories.

It was a wonderful mix of different approaches and work with different cohorts, ranging from songwriting and dance performances with primary school children, to video-making with pensioners’ groups. I was privileged to play a role, delivering some digital storytelling sessions to community groups in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Ayrshire.

As Jennifer Jones, the Project Manager said to me, this video is probably the best tool for explaining what digital storytelling is about. I certainly don’t disagree.

Seaside Recollections – A Project Proposal

This is an idea for a project which I think could be an important model for assisting with older people’s fading memories, as well as exploring and raising the profile of British Seaside towns.

I am looking for £30,000 to make this happen. Please get in touch if you can help.

Is the British seaside holiday dead?

  • Is there anything from it worth preserving, beyond its impact on the local economies of some fairly Isolated towns?
  • How important are the memories from our seaside holidays? Individually and collectively?
  • Can seaside memories play a role in helping people with dementia?

Everybody remembers their holidays, don’t they? For many of us they are the stand out moment of a relatively mundane year. Do you remember those long, hot afternoons on the beach, or that time staring out to sea while the rain pounded down on the roof of the car? If we are lucky enough to have holidays, they linger in the mind; they provide punctuation points in the narrative of our lives, and we return to them in our daydreams. But, how long do we remember them? Do you still remember your childhood holidays?

This project has a threefold purpose.

  1. To connect isolated older people with their holiday memories in an interactive, real-time basis in a way which both stimulates their memories, and sparks their interest in the potential of communications technologies;
  2. To collect holiday stories linked with particular seaside locations;
  3. To stimulate wider interest in seaside towns as visitor destinations.

How the project will work.

This will require participation from:

  • Charities and agencies working with older people;
  • Care homes and sheltered accommodation providers;
  • Individual older people and their relatives and carers;
  • Tourism and visitor offices  for seaside towns;
  • Local authorities and local economic development agencies in seaside towns;
  • Digital agencies and the local digital community in seaside towns.


Phase 1

Gathering Memories

The first stage of the project will be to collect older people’s memories of seaside holidays. This will be achieved through:

  • Video interviews with older people;
  • Collecting and digitising old photographs of holiday locations from older people and from other locations;
  • Blog posts and online stories
  • Stories emailed and archived

This material will be collected directly, by older people themselves, by friends family and support workers and collated to an online hub.

Phase 2

Curation and Training

Phase 2 of the project will be to work with the older people to help them to organise the material which stimulates their memories, and to relate those memories to specific locations. At this stage, older people, their carers, support workers and staff will be trained to interact and engage with the project. Equipment will be provided and training to use it to enable the older people to engage in real-time with Phase 3. And the locations to be visited in Phase 3 of the project will be chosen.

Phase 3

Seaside Tour

Phase 3 will be based around a seaside tour. John Popham will visit seaside locations chosen by the older people in Phase 2 of the project. During the visits he will interact with the older people directly online, using live streaming, video conference connections, and otherwise, and be guided by them as to what to see, where to visit, and who to talk to. There will be live, real-time interactions between the places and people John visits and the older people who are guiding him. This will further stimulate the memories of the older people, and encourage them to explore using new technologies to communicate and pursue their interests.

As well as interacting with older people, John’s visits will be an opportunity to explore the condition of the British seaside holiday. Guided by the older people, he will investigate what has changed, and what has stayed the same between the memories described by the older people in the project and the modern reality. This will provide opportunities for interactions with local media, local politicians and local government. The visits to each location will be maximised for publicity potential, and for the opportunities to generate discussion and debate about the past, present and future of the British seaside.

Opportunities will also be explored to collect and collate more material, gathered in the seaside locations themselves, to add to the seaside holiday memory bank and online hub.

Phase 4

Curation, collation, evaluation and future planning.

  • Pulling all the material together
  • Producing a video summary of the project
  • Publishing all the material online
  • evaluation against defined objectives
  • Planning future actions

What is needed to make this happen?

  • Funding for project management and delivery
  • Google Chromecasts
  • Tablet computers
  • Travel
  • Accomodation
  • Room hire

Please get in touch if you can help

 

Stimulating memories – dealing with dementia

This morning I was in the kitchen with Radio 4 on, and happened to catch an episode of this week’s Book of the Week, which is “Gold Fever” by Steve Boggan. The book is an account of how the author decided to see if it was possible to make a fortune by re-visiting the sites of the 19th Century Californian Goldrush. I have caught little bits of it throughout the week, and, from what I can tell, he didn’t succeed in making a fortune, but he did come back with some great stories featuring the characters from the original rush, and some from more recent times.

In today’s episode, he was searching for “the man”, the character who had made the most from prospecting gold in recent years. Eventually he tracked down someone who had made a small fortune from rare gold finds, but the gentleman in question now suffers from Alzheimer’s. The story recounted the author’s frustration with extracting information from the man whose memory had faded. All this changed however, when he decided to take “the man” back to the scene of his prospecting. He then came alive and bubbled over with stories about his former life.

People who work with those who have dementia often talk about their long term memories being sound, but that they can’t remember what happened yesterday. We need to do more work on stimulating memories by helping them to relive their former lives. And, I have a suspicion that, when such people spend much of their lives not being mobile or stimulated, it could just be that what happened yesterday is just not worth remembering.

And, of course, we can now use digital technologies to help stimulate memories, as in the brilliant video below. Let’s do more of this, please!

You can hear the “Gold Fever” programme here.

General Election 2015 – Touring the Polling Stations

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It’s a matter of extreme frustration to me that the benefits that digital technology is bringing to all our lives are seemingly not allowed to touch the world of politics. And so it is that most of us will pick up a piece of card which came through the letterbox a few weeks ago and trudge off to a drafty school hall to place a cross on a piece of paper.

I think younger people in particular find this ridiculous, and it is a reason why many of them don’t vote. We need secure, online voting, and we need it well before the next General Election.

So, to highlight this absurdity, I have decided to spend a substantial part of this General Election Day touring the 10 nearest Polling Stations to my house. And I’ll be doing this on foot. I expect to have to buy a new pair of shoes by the end of the day. I’ll be recording my reflections on the way.

Watch out for the updates, on my Twitter account.

See you later. And, whoever you support, or don’t want to get in. Vote!

Here is the map of the polling stations. It is on Google Maps at https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=zPzr7KA767V8.khe9J9CRM4Dk

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Stories not Statistics

You know me I like stories. I promote storytelling; particularly Digital Storytelling.

I am constantly being told that evidence is what matters. That you cannot tell stories without evidence. Well, that may be true…. but….

Most people would agree that social housing and the people who live in it have been unfairly stigmatised. Despite all the efforts to get social housing to be a key issue in the 2015 General Election, whenever the subject of housing is raised, the politicians end up arguing over which party does most to promote home ownership. It’s like Mrs. Thatcher’s oft quoted view that anyone over 30 who uses a bus is a failure. She also changed the paradigm so that society’s prevailing view is that anyone who doesn’t own their own home is a failure, or at least that is what everyone should be aspiring to.

And so, social housing tenants are stigmatised, and the media pile in reinforcing this stereotype by pumping out poverty porn like “Benefits Street”, “How to Get a Council House”, “Skint”, and “Immigration Street”.  And still, people tell me that he only way to counter this view is by producing evidence to the contrary. And the evidence they want to produce comes in the form of reports, statistics and infographics.

But, stop to think for a moment. Where is the evidence that backs up the viewpoint promoted by the purveyors of poverty porn? It’s not there. They go out, they find a story they want to tell, and they tell that story, whatever the evidence might suggest. And they are the ones whose world view prevails. The public is not interested in evidence. If they were, news channels would have larger viewing figures than soap operas.

So, please; by all means produce your reports, your statistics, and your infographics. But don’t kid yourself that any of this wins hearts and minds. It’s the stories of people living happy and productive lives in social housing that will be much more persuasive.

Why I won’t be joining your Twitter Thunderclap

This is by way of explanation to the many people who ask me to join their Twitter Thunderclaps.

If you don’t know what a Twitter Thunderclap is, it’s a service whereby you can encourage people to sign up at a website, and then all the accounts which are subscribed send out the same tweet at the same time. It is used in support of campaigns.

I won’t be joining it because I hate it. I constantly tell people that social media is about being social. It’s about conversations. What happens when there is a Thunderclap is that people’s Twitter timelines get blitzed by hundreds or thousands of identical tweets. To me, this is a blunt instrument. It’s like loads of people running simultaneously into the room where I am and yelling at me. And what does it achieve? Only the people online at the time the Thunderclap goes out see it. The rest miss it completely. I suspect that only reason it persists is that most of the people who participate don’t actually see what happens. They are too busy doing other things.

To me, the essence of social media campaigning is engaging people in conversations about your cause. It is about building up momentum through posting different kinds of content over a period of time. It is about being engaging, being human, and being entertaining. I believe Thunderclaps are the antithesis of this. So I won’t be participating. And, I hope you will consider the impact of yelling at me in this way before you sign up for your next Thunderclap.

 

The First Digital Makeover

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Well, we did it! The first Digital Makeover is complete. Helen Reynolds and myself are offering organisational Digital Makeovers in which we go in and try to reach every part of the company with some digital magic over the course of 2 days.

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We had a great time working with some wonderful people at Yorkshire Coast Homes. The feedback was fantastic, the energy of the staff and board members we worked with was infectious, and it all carried us through the barrier of tiredness which hit us towards the end of the second day. We even managed to fit in a great Tweetup on the Monday evening, which allowed us to make further contact with some of the Scarborough digital community.

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Here’s the Storify of the 2 days http://sfy.co/a0Lbe

Having done one, we are desperate to do more. It’s such a fantastic way of working. If you’d like us to visit you next, please email us at enquiries@powerplayers.info

Cricket and Social Media – Finding the Stories

2015-02-03 20.10.36This week was the second Workshop in the Bradford element of the Cricket and Social Media project I am undertaking with the England & Wales Cricket Board (ECB).

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Towards the end of the workshop, I asked attendees to suggest their favourite cricketing stories. One person said, “well we did have a naked cricket match at our club once”. That was unexpected, and caused a fair degree of hilarity in the group.

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I’d like to thank Colin Beveridge for tracking down the Daily Telegraph report of the match for me. Just goes to show, you can never predict what kinds of stories you are going to uncover.

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Cricket and Social Media

New Year, New Project.

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I am very pleased to announce that I will be working with the England & Wales Cricket Board (ECB) over the next couple of months to assist grassroots cricketers to make better use of social media to celebrate what they do, and, crucially, to reach out to what the ECB defines as “occasional” and “cameo” players (i.e. those with varying degrees of commitment to playing the game regularly), with a view to engaging them more fully in the activities of their clubs and leagues.

Participation in cricket is declining, and the key aim of this work is to try to address that by encouraging club cricketers to use social media in imaginative ways to raise the profile of the benefits of playing the game on a regular basis.

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This is a pilot initiative, and during January and February, I will be running a programme of 3 evening workshops for club cricketers in each of the Bradford and Huddersfield areas. If this goes well, then there is a strong possibility of extending it into other areas. And the first session in each of the workshop programmes will be an informal discussion over a curry, an idea that I have unashamedly pinched from the Social Care Curry movement.

I am very excited about this, and also grateful to Twitter-friend Graham Hyde for mentioning my name to the ECB. I’ve been a cricket-nut since a small child and I am really happy to be able to combine my loves of cricket and social media. Watch this space for reports of progress.

Stand up for positive uses of the internet

This morning’s edition of the Today programme on BBC Radio 4 was guest-edited by the musician, Tracey Thorn. There were two sections of the programme which were about how the internet can help vulnerable teenagers find support online. There were some great, inspiring stories, but, both of the items were topped and tailed by negative comments from the programme presenters suggesting that this kind of thing is a rarity on the internet, amongst a sea of trolls and threats.

We can’t allow the mainstream media to go unchallenged when it pedals this line, partly out of self-interest as the web eats away at its audiences. There are millions of positive interactions every day online, many of which go ignored by TV, Radio and Newspapers. Just look at all the offers of free Christmas Dinners for those who would otherwise spend Christmas alone, as only one example. The web is a powerful force for social good, and the media cannot be allowed to get away with suggesting otherwise.