Could you Sponsor a Live-Stream?

Photo by Duncan Morrow

 

I am looking for sponsors. Does your organisation want to raise its profile in the Public, Charitable, or non-profit sectors?

As long-time readers of this blog will know, I specialise in high-quality, low-cost, live video streaming for non-profit organisations. Not all organisations in these sectors can afford even the low prices I charge to stream their events. So, are you a company or other organisation that wants to raise its profile in the sector? Why not consider sponsoring a live stream for a non-profit event? This can be an event  that your organisation is already present at, or it might be something you want your audience to be able to watch, or it could just be in a market where you want to get involved.

Please get in touch for a chat about how we might work together.

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If you would like to support me to do more of my work in using Digital Storytelling, social media, and video for social good, please consider making a regular contribution via Patreon or perhaps, just buy me a coffee here

27,000 people at a Local Authority Committee Meeting?

At the recent #NotWestminster event I asked if any local authorities were streaming meetings via Facebook. No one present knew of any, and quite a few people there expressed doubts that doing so would be a good idea as they would be fearful of the kind of comments that would come in during meetings.

And then, yesterday, my attention was drawn to a Facebook Live stream of Luton Council’s Development Control meeting, which was actually being done by the local BBC radio station, BBC Three Counties.

Now, this meeting was very high profile, as the main item on the agenda was a proposed development which included the building of a new stadium for Luton Town Football Club. But, nevertheless, it illustrates my point that this is something that local authorities should consider, as the level of engagement during the meeting would be higher than if they continue to stream via self-contained platforms.

Yesterday’s meeting was broadcast in two halves.

Part one is here. At the time of writing this, this video has had more than 19,000 views and attracted 1,655 comments.

Part two is here. At the time of writing this, this video has had more than 27,000 views and attracted 2,936 comments.

Now I know this meeting is a special case. But I still contend that using Facebook Live to stream Council meetings has to be tried as a way of engaging the public in council business. I can help you do this. If you’d like my help, please get in touch.

After all, there aren’t many Council committee rooms that could accommodate 27,000 members of the public.

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While you are here, can I please ask you to take a minute to subscribe to my YouTube Channel here

If you would like to support me to do more of my work in using Digital Storytelling, social media, and video for social good, please consider making a regular contribution via Patreon or perhaps, just buy me a coffee here

Live Streaming as a Fund-Raising Technique?

I don’t want to draw attention to it, so no links, but, did you know that the so-called “Yellow Vests” who have been protesting in pursuit of their aim of a “No Deal” Brexit in London and elsewhere in the UK have been live video streaming all their activities and using their live streams to solicit donations to their cause? As I understand it they have been raising substantial sums for their cause this way, and effectively funding themselves to spend their time on the streets of Westminster and other cities rather than doing another job.

This makes me think. Could we use this technique for a socially useful purposes? What do you think? Any ideas?

On a, slightly un-related note. I came across this video of a live-streaming “factory” in China. This is basically a large house where young women live and work shifts live streaming themselves. As I understand it there is nothing necessarily sexual in this, they effectively offer themselves as friends to lonely people, mainly young men, who are sitting at home in their bedrooms with no one else to talk to. And they make a living out of it. What do you think of this?

While you are here, can I please ask you to take a minute to subscribe to my YouTube Channel here

If you would like to support me to do more of my work in using Digital Storytelling, social media, and video for social good, please consider making a regular contribution via Patreon or perhaps, just buy me a coffee here

 

Engagement Through Live Streaming

I first started live video streaming events in 2010. Have experimented with live streaming as a fun exercise, I was prompted to take it up on a serious basis when a former employer complained about the cost of live streaming an event and I offered to do it for them at a much lower price.

Over the years I have evolved my practice, changed the way I do things, and improved the quality of the output. And I have also operated through a period when live streaming has become mainstream, and a thing that lots of people think they can do. This has resulted in a proliferation of live streams, some of which have been OK in quality, but many more of which have been blurry video with indistinct and/or echoey sound. It takes a lot of effort and some additional equipment to produce a live stream which people are likely to want to watch all the way through, and you can certainly forget it if the sound is poor.

One of the big game-changers on the live-streaming front has been the advent of Facebook Live. In many respects, Facebook Live is just another video platform, but something that makes it unique is that, for those organisations which have built communities on Facebook, whether through Groups or Pages, it adds an opportunity directly to address that community and engage them in events and other work.

Just recently I have live streamed two events for Rethink Mental Illness (formerly the Schizophrenia Foundation). The first event was a panel discussion to mark National Schizophrenia day. To date, the live video has been watched by more than 10,000 people. You can see this one here. And then, yesterday, I live streamed Rethink’s Members’ Day in Sheffield. Only a day later, the video from the morning session has had more than 3,500 views, and the afternoon workshop has over 4,400 views.

And in September, as part of Healthier Lancashire and South Cumbria’s Digital Transformation Programme, I live streamed a Patient Participation Group Meeting for Library House Surgery in Chorley. I think it is safe to say that everyone involved was bowled over by the fact that more than 500 people watched this meeting on the night, and that, within 48 hours that figure had gone up to more than 2,000. This is for a group that regularly attracts an attendance of fewer than 15 people.

To me, these projects have provided powerful evidence of the power of live streaming for social good organisations to engage people in their work. But I think one of the most prominent lessons is the use of live streaming to build on communities already built up on Facebook. Both Rethink Mental Illness and Library House Surgery already had thriving, interactive Facebook communities, and that greatly increased the reach of their live videos. Rethink were able to draw a wide audience into their events, and, for Library House Surgery, the live video drew people in to participate in development of their services who would not otherwise attend meetings.

The public and third sectors are populated with organisations which have missions to engage members or the wider public in their work. Social media and live video streaming, separately or combined together, have amazing potential to draw people into events and other aspects of an organisation’s work. But the live streaming has to be done well. Broadcasting low quality video, particularly if the sound is difficult to hear, could put people off rather than engage them.

I have a mission to use video and social media to help organisations engage with their client groups. One of my specialisms is high quality, but low-priced, live video streaming. I would love to work with more organisations to use live video to engage large audiences in their work. Please get in touch if you would like me to work with you.

Live-streaming a Patient Participation Group

I am very excited that this Thursday I will be undertaking what I reckon must be a world-first; I’ll be live streaming a Patient Participation Group (PPG). From 6:45pm, the Library House Surgery PPG in Chorley, Lancashire will be live streamed on the surgery’s Facebook Page. I have long been an advocate for live streaming as a means to involve people in the work of public agencies, and I am very pleased to be part of this groundbreaking opportunity to open up the PPG to those who cannot attend meetings.

I am happy to be working with Healthier Lancashire & South Cumbria and Redmoor Health on this initiative.  For any organisations who want to do something similar to engage wider audiences in their work, please get in touch.

Here’s my YouTube video trailing the event.

Thanks for reading.

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Many thanks.