There’s no point installing hospital wifi if patients can’t access it

I am still hopeful of progress in the campaign to get free wifi for patients in all NHS hospitals, particularly after what Tim Kelsey said at an event I was present at in March (see here).

But, you know what’s really frustrating? There are a number of cases where hospitals have installed wifi and yet the patients still can’t access it because none of the staff who have regular contact with patients know anything about it. While visiting my own local hospital, I asked at the information desk how to access the wifi and was told that no one there knew.

Can someone please spread the message that it is pointless installing wifi if patients can’t access it. This is doubly frustrating for disconnected patients.

Here’s an example of a hospital wifi login screen. I was unable to get online.

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Seaside Recollections – A Project Proposal

This is an idea for a project which I think could be an important model for assisting with older people’s fading memories, as well as exploring and raising the profile of British Seaside towns.

I am looking for £30,000 to make this happen. Please get in touch if you can help.

Is the British seaside holiday dead?

  • Is there anything from it worth preserving, beyond its impact on the local economies of some fairly Isolated towns?
  • How important are the memories from our seaside holidays? Individually and collectively?
  • Can seaside memories play a role in helping people with dementia?

Everybody remembers their holidays, don’t they? For many of us they are the stand out moment of a relatively mundane year. Do you remember those long, hot afternoons on the beach, or that time staring out to sea while the rain pounded down on the roof of the car? If we are lucky enough to have holidays, they linger in the mind; they provide punctuation points in the narrative of our lives, and we return to them in our daydreams. But, how long do we remember them? Do you still remember your childhood holidays?

This project has a threefold purpose.

  1. To connect isolated older people with their holiday memories in an interactive, real-time basis in a way which both stimulates their memories, and sparks their interest in the potential of communications technologies;
  2. To collect holiday stories linked with particular seaside locations;
  3. To stimulate wider interest in seaside towns as visitor destinations.

How the project will work.

This will require participation from:

  • Charities and agencies working with older people;
  • Care homes and sheltered accommodation providers;
  • Individual older people and their relatives and carers;
  • Tourism and visitor offices  for seaside towns;
  • Local authorities and local economic development agencies in seaside towns;
  • Digital agencies and the local digital community in seaside towns.


Phase 1

Gathering Memories

The first stage of the project will be to collect older people’s memories of seaside holidays. This will be achieved through:

  • Video interviews with older people;
  • Collecting and digitising old photographs of holiday locations from older people and from other locations;
  • Blog posts and online stories
  • Stories emailed and archived

This material will be collected directly, by older people themselves, by friends family and support workers and collated to an online hub.

Phase 2

Curation and Training

Phase 2 of the project will be to work with the older people to help them to organise the material which stimulates their memories, and to relate those memories to specific locations. At this stage, older people, their carers, support workers and staff will be trained to interact and engage with the project. Equipment will be provided and training to use it to enable the older people to engage in real-time with Phase 3. And the locations to be visited in Phase 3 of the project will be chosen.

Phase 3

Seaside Tour

Phase 3 will be based around a seaside tour. John Popham will visit seaside locations chosen by the older people in Phase 2 of the project. During the visits he will interact with the older people directly online, using live streaming, video conference connections, and otherwise, and be guided by them as to what to see, where to visit, and who to talk to. There will be live, real-time interactions between the places and people John visits and the older people who are guiding him. This will further stimulate the memories of the older people, and encourage them to explore using new technologies to communicate and pursue their interests.

As well as interacting with older people, John’s visits will be an opportunity to explore the condition of the British seaside holiday. Guided by the older people, he will investigate what has changed, and what has stayed the same between the memories described by the older people in the project and the modern reality. This will provide opportunities for interactions with local media, local politicians and local government. The visits to each location will be maximised for publicity potential, and for the opportunities to generate discussion and debate about the past, present and future of the British seaside.

Opportunities will also be explored to collect and collate more material, gathered in the seaside locations themselves, to add to the seaside holiday memory bank and online hub.

Phase 4

Curation, collation, evaluation and future planning.

  • Pulling all the material together
  • Producing a video summary of the project
  • Publishing all the material online
  • evaluation against defined objectives
  • Planning future actions

What is needed to make this happen?

  • Funding for project management and delivery
  • Google Chromecasts
  • Tablet computers
  • Travel
  • Accomodation
  • Room hire

Please get in touch if you can help

 

Stimulating memories – dealing with dementia

This morning I was in the kitchen with Radio 4 on, and happened to catch an episode of this week’s Book of the Week, which is “Gold Fever” by Steve Boggan. The book is an account of how the author decided to see if it was possible to make a fortune by re-visiting the sites of the 19th Century Californian Goldrush. I have caught little bits of it throughout the week, and, from what I can tell, he didn’t succeed in making a fortune, but he did come back with some great stories featuring the characters from the original rush, and some from more recent times.

In today’s episode, he was searching for “the man”, the character who had made the most from prospecting gold in recent years. Eventually he tracked down someone who had made a small fortune from rare gold finds, but the gentleman in question now suffers from Alzheimer’s. The story recounted the author’s frustration with extracting information from the man whose memory had faded. All this changed however, when he decided to take “the man” back to the scene of his prospecting. He then came alive and bubbled over with stories about his former life.

People who work with those who have dementia often talk about their long term memories being sound, but that they can’t remember what happened yesterday. We need to do more work on stimulating memories by helping them to relive their former lives. And, I have a suspicion that, when such people spend much of their lives not being mobile or stimulated, it could just be that what happened yesterday is just not worth remembering.

And, of course, we can now use digital technologies to help stimulate memories, as in the brilliant video below. Let’s do more of this, please!

You can hear the “Gold Fever” programme here.

What I learned from my walking tour of 10 Polling Stations on General Election Day 2015

As trailed this morning, today I did a walking tour of the 10 Polling Stations nearest to my house on General Election Day. I did this to highlight the ridiculous situation that our voting system still uses 19th Century methods in 2015. I hope that we will have online voting before the country as a whole does this again.

First, here’s the story of the day.

 

Prelude

 

The Starting Point

 

 

Polling Station 1 – I voted

 

Polling Station 2

 

Polling Station 3

 

Polling Station 4

 

Polling Station 5

 

Polling Station 6

 

Polling Station 7

 

Polling Station 8

 

Polling Station 9

 

Polling Station 10

 

So, what did I learn?

Well, I learned that the terrain of Huddersfield is pretty challenging, something I already knew, but perhaps needed to be reminded of. And some of the Polling Stations were in quite hilly places. They must be difficult to get to for people with restricted mobility.

I also learned that Polling Stations are in some pretty varied places. But, in my sample of 10, there was only one, at Paddock Village Hall, that was in a place which seemed to be offering other reasons for people to be there, namely a community cafe.

And I perhaps learned most from the 40 minute break I took along the way in a pub. I overheard a couple of conversations, one involving two people who were voting today for the first time in years “because it’s important this time, isn’t it?”; and one about voting in Australia, which is not only compulsory, but, it seems, is made an occasion of, with barbecues at the Polling Stations.

I think we need to move to online voting as soon as possible. But, in the interim, barbecues at Polling Stations doesn’t seem like a bad idea.

General Election 2015 – Touring the Polling Stations

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It’s a matter of extreme frustration to me that the benefits that digital technology is bringing to all our lives are seemingly not allowed to touch the world of politics. And so it is that most of us will pick up a piece of card which came through the letterbox a few weeks ago and trudge off to a drafty school hall to place a cross on a piece of paper.

I think younger people in particular find this ridiculous, and it is a reason why many of them don’t vote. We need secure, online voting, and we need it well before the next General Election.

So, to highlight this absurdity, I have decided to spend a substantial part of this General Election Day touring the 10 nearest Polling Stations to my house. And I’ll be doing this on foot. I expect to have to buy a new pair of shoes by the end of the day. I’ll be recording my reflections on the way.

Watch out for the updates, on my Twitter account.

See you later. And, whoever you support, or don’t want to get in. Vote!

Here is the map of the polling stations. It is on Google Maps at https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=zPzr7KA767V8.khe9J9CRM4Dk

Screen Shot 2015-05-07 at 09.27.42

Older People, Technology, and Social Isolation

This is by way of a progress report on my ambition to put measures in place to make sure no older person needs to be lonely at Christmas 2015 if technology can provide a solution for them.

digitparty_leeds1

This is a description of some things I have done, some I have observed and some I am planning. In some cases I am describing plans and concepts and cannot go into real details as there are negotiations on-going to confirm arrangements. Everything I am setting out here, though, is a practical contribution to ensuring that the barriers to new technology adoption among older people can be broken down. They are also demonstrations of what needs to be done. I could not claim that the totality of what is here is a comprehensive approach. We need to scale these initiatives up, roll them out across the country, and fill in the gaps. I am still looking for funding to make more of this happen. Please get in touch if you can help.

Digital Tea Parties

During the past year I have run Digital Tea Parties in Leeds, Trafford, and Whitby, and there are a number of others in the planning stage. Digital Tea Parties are a great way of introducing older people to new technologies in a non-threatening environment. They allow the focus to be put on human communications and individual and community interests, rather than shiny tech. They are a familiar environment, in trusted locations, and they offer opportunities for those with a degree of interest to take the lead in introducing their peers to new gadgets. It is important in my view not to try to force people to use technologies they are uncomfortable with at the outset. Seeing others like them having a go can overcome that “tech is not for people like me” prejudice that often acts as a barrier.

digitparty_leeds3

Providing Connectivity

I am working with partners to connect up a sheltered housing complex, provide free wifi throughout and run a number of digital tea party-type sessions to kickstart residents’ use of new technologies. We intend this to be a demonstrator project that can be rolled out widely.

Relevant Content

I am convinced that one of the barriers to new technology adoption is that older people struggle to find content that is of interest to them. And, in addition to this, I believe that activities such as slumping in front of the television actually contribute to older people’s social isolation by disengaging them from the world around them. Work at Digital Tea Parties, particularly the reaction to the pub crawl video at Urmston, convinced me that people need content to engage with that is directly relevant to them, as I expanded on here. I have now secured funding as part of a larger project to develop this idea further and to create content which can be used with groups of older people to engage them with their local communities.

I am also seeking funding to run this Seaside Recollections project in which I would tour seaside locations guided in real-time by older people in pursuit of their memories of childhood holidays.

digitparty_leeds4

Reminsences and recordings

Also as part of the above, secured, project, I will be conducting video and audio interviews with older people participating in the initiative. I believe this is an important thing to do for a number of reasons, namely;

  • it stimulates the older person’s memory
  • it breaks down some of the barriers to new technology adoption
  • it creates more content of interest to older people
  • it can change perceptions of older people by allowing them to present themselves as they were in their younger days
  •  it contributes to project evaluation

Staff Digital Confidence

I am working on a number of initiatives to promote digital skills, confidence and fluency amongst staff working with older people. None of these yet have funding, which is extremely disappointing, because I firmly believe that often staff act as gatekeepers, seeking to keep the older people away from technology because they are frightened of the consequences of letting them loose on it.

 

All of these are activities which can turn the tide in the battle to promote technology adoption among older people, and achieve the ultimate goal of breaking down loneliness and isolation. We need to roll these things out more widely and scale them up. If you can help, please let me know.

 

Convincing older people to join the digital life

2015-04-07 12.20.05

Yesterday I ran another Digital Tea Party, this time with Leeds and Yorkshire Housing Association at their West Thorpe Sheltered Accommodation site in Whitby.

This was a Digital Tea Party with a difference, as we hadn’t had the opportunity to test the connectivity at the venue before the event. When I arrived I discovered that, not only did the in-house wifi not extend to the residents’ lounge, but there was little or no 3G or 4G connectivity available either. Eventually, I managed to get online via Emily Fulda‘s phone, but I could only connect my laptop, and we couldn’t get any of the other devices we had online. That meant the event resembled a lecture more than it did a party.

Nevertheless, it turned out to work quite well. While setting up, I put the video below on the screen, and it immediately generated a discussion, centred on the steam-powered bus it featured, which apparently has been banned from the streets due to a number of issues around its operation.

Discussion in the group moved on to where people came from. 4 of the residents had originated in Leeds so I was able to show a video that had been very popular at the Digital Tea Parties in Leeds

And then we discovered a real gem. One of the residents had himself been videoed reading his poems, so we were able to find those on Youtube and show them to the gathering

This was a particularly important breakthrough. I have found that in these circumstances it is important to break down the “technology is for for young people” argument. This is often achieved by finding one or two enthusiasts in the group, and getting them to lead the way and act as champions with the rest. Here, we were able to show videos of one of the residents who was himself a digital trailblazer. This sparked curiosity even in some members who had been disengaged up till this point. David talked about how he chats to his brother in Australia using Facetime. Unfortunately, it was not possible to arrange a demo of this, in part due to the poor connectivity we were experiencing, and, perhaps, mainly due to the fact that his brother would have been soundly asleep at the time.

digiteaparty_whitby2

So the discussion ranged from keeping in touch with relatives, via online shopping, to being able to listen online to local radio stations from back home. And then we were on to musical tastes. A couple of classical music videos were run for the benefit of residents, and then a member of the group mentioned he was into AC/DC. Although a rendition of the great Australian band’s “Thunderstruck” did not go down that well with most in the room, there was much more interest when I asked if anyone had seen the Bad Piper’s version below.

I’ve come across too many events with older people where it has been assumed their musical tastes are rooted in the 1930s. Most people’s musical tastes are forged in their teenage years. If you were a teenager in the 1930s you will be well into your 90s now. Most of the residents at our event were in their 70s and would have been teenagers in the 1950s and 60s. Thus AC/DC is a much more likely choice than is Vera Lynn.

The connectivity issues meant that we were unable to do as much as I wanted, and there was little opportunity for any hands on work with gadgets. But, I still think the event worked. There was lively discussion about the role of technology in member’s lives, with quite a few myths dispelled, and residents challenging each other to give things a try. I think it is very important to get these kinds of issues sorted, rather than forcing people to use technology at their first session if they are reluctant. That kind of approach can turn them off forever. I always say that we have to “normalise” the use of technology in people’s lives. And the first step can often be just to get them talking about it, and not treating it as an alien concept.

After the event, myself and the team from LYHA, Emily, Dan Marshall, and Rio Overton, decided to take a brief advantage of the glorious April weather by heading down to the beach. We passed the huge queues for the numerous Whitby Fish & Chip shops, along the harbourside and onto the beach. And, of course, because Rio was named after the song by Duran Duran, it was compulsory for her to dance in the sand

As I’ve mentioned before, I am determined to do more of these kinds of events, with a view to making sure, by Christmas 2015, that we have comprehensive mechanisms in place to ensure everybody who needs to can access technology to break down their loneliness and isolation. Please get in touch if you’d like to work with me on events like this and more.

 

Podcast: Tom Murtha on How Social Housing saved his life, and giving a platform to views of a certain kind

Tom Murtha, a well-respected senior figure in the social housing movement, caused a few waves recently when he twice walked out on speakers at the Homes for Britain rally. So, for my latest Podcast, I wanted to ask him why he did this, and why he thinks giving platforms to people with certain views is potentially damaging to the housing sector.

We also discussed Tom’s wide-ranging career in social housing, and how he believes he owes his life to social housing and to the advent of the NHS.

I interviewed Tom over Skype, which was Tom’s first experience of using the tool. It all went (largely) remarkably well, as you will hear:

 

The First Digital Makeover

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Well, we did it! The first Digital Makeover is complete. Helen Reynolds and myself are offering organisational Digital Makeovers in which we go in and try to reach every part of the company with some digital magic over the course of 2 days.

ych1

We had a great time working with some wonderful people at Yorkshire Coast Homes. The feedback was fantastic, the energy of the staff and board members we worked with was infectious, and it all carried us through the barrier of tiredness which hit us towards the end of the second day. We even managed to fit in a great Tweetup on the Monday evening, which allowed us to make further contact with some of the Scarborough digital community.

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Here’s the Storify of the 2 days http://sfy.co/a0Lbe

Having done one, we are desperate to do more. It’s such a fantastic way of working. If you’d like us to visit you next, please email us at enquiries@powerplayers.info