Housing Vote 2017

This is the start of the Campaign to get Social Housing tenants in the UK to register to vote and to be enabled to make informed choices at the General Election on June 8th 2017.

Social Housing providers are prone to complain that Government doesn’t understand them, despite the resources they invest in lobbying. And yet, large proportions of their 4 million tenants don’t vote. Let’s change this. Tenants voting and making informed decisions has to be the way forward.

Please see my video below launching the Campaign, there will be more to follow on this. In the meantime, please contribute your ideas for the Campaign in the comments below to add to these ideas already raised:

  • Social Housing providers to close their offices on Election Day and to deploy staff in helping tenants to get to the Polling Stations;
  • Organising Housing Hustings in venues accessible to tenants (and live-streaming them for those who cannot attend);
  • Displaying information on how to register to vote in Housing Offices and on Housing Websites;
  • Displaying information on where Polling Stations are in Housing Offices and on Housing Websites:

Please share this post and the YouTube video below to get the Campaign going, and use the hashtag #housingvote17 on social media. I have also started a Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/johnpopham to raise money for the Campaign and other things I do in the future.

Friendships not Transactions

I need to get this off my chest.

I couldn’t possibly count the number of times people have given me the excuse for not pursuing digital transformation that recipients of services would miss the personal touch. Indeed I am repeatedly told that, for many the regular interaction with their care worker / housing officer / other professional is their only human contact.

I have 2 responses to this argument.

The first is, why are we not making more use of technology to reduce isolation and increase human contact? First priority in this for me is to assist people to use social networking to make new friends who they can subsequently meet in person. Second priority is to connect people together online, whether it be via social media sites, or via video conferencing.

My second response is this. What has our society come to if the only personal contact people have is with those who are paid to deliver a service to them? This is not right and it should not be used as an excuse for holding back progress. I refer you back to my first response for how we should be dealing with this. Let’s help people make and maintain real friendships, not rely on perfunctory transactions for a semblance of human warmth.

Here’s Paro the robot seal which has proven really good at connecting with older people.

Connected Christmas… and Every Day

Loneliness and isolation are killers. There is increasing evidence of this. Indeed, research suggests that loneliness is more deadly than smoking 15 cigarettes a day or obesity. For the past 4 years, I have been working to address the situation by ensuring that older people can be introduced to new technologies in ways which are engaging and which demonstrate to them their usefulness to their lives, particularly how they can enable them to communicate with friends, family, professionals and support networks. And yes, I know that digital contact can be no substitute for face-to-face interaction, but, for people who have no interactions at all, it can certainly help them to build and maintain contacts that would not otherwise be available to them.

In an era when millions of us are keeping touch with our professional and personal networks online all the time, most of the people in greatest need of regular interaction are excluded from these benefits by their own lack of knowledge, unfounded fears, and the technophobia of the professionals who work with them. The work I have done over recent years with older people has clearly demonstrated that, if approached in the right way, their interest can be sparked, their fears can be overcome, and they can be guided on the path to regular online communication.

Every year at Christmas the media picks up on stories about people’s loneliness and isolation. Well, it’s quite a long time till Christmas 2017, but I am starting early on the road to making sure that by the time Christmas comes around, major inroads can be made to changing the situation of many lonely older people.

I am looking for partners to work with me on this strategy, and funders and sponsors able to help me make it happen. Much of what follows is recycled from an earlier post, which is still relevant, and which still forms the framework for my programme to end loneliness by digital means. This year it is going to happen. Contact me if you can contribute.

Digital Tea Parties

During the past four years I have run Digital Tea Parties in Leeds, TraffordWhitby, Calderdale, and London, and there are a number of others in the planning stage. Digital Tea Parties are a great way of introducing older people to new technologies in a non-threatening environment. They allow the focus to be put on human communications and individual and community interests, rather than shiny tech. They are a familiar environment, in trusted locations, and they offer opportunities for those with a degree of interest to take the lead in introducing their peers to new gadgets. It is important in my view not to try to force people to use technologies they are uncomfortable with at the outset. Seeing others like them having a go can overcome that “tech is not for people like me” prejudice that often acts as a barrier.

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Providing Connectivity

I have worked with partners to connect up a number of sheltered housing complexes, provide free wifi throughout and run a number of digital tea party-type sessions to kickstart residents’ use of new technologies.

Relevant Content

I am convinced that one of the barriers to new technology adoption is that older people struggle to find content that is of interest to them. And, in addition to this, I believe that activities such as slumping in front of the television actually contribute to older people’s social isolation by disengaging them from the world around them. Work at Digital Tea Parties, particularly the reaction to the pub crawl video at Urmston, convinced me that people need content to engage with that is directly relevant to them, as I expanded on here.

I am also seeking funding to run this Seaside Recollections project in which I would tour seaside locations guided in real-time by older people in pursuit of their memories of childhood holidays.

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Reminsences and recordings

I have conducted a number of video and audio interviews with older people. I believe this is an important thing to do for a number of reasons, namely;

  • it stimulates the older person’s memory
  • it breaks down some of the barriers to new technology adoption
  • it creates more content of interest to older people
  • it can change perceptions of older people by allowing them to present themselves as they were in their younger days
  • it contributes to project evaluation

Staff Digital Confidence

I am working on a number of initiatives to promote digital skills, confidence and fluency amongst staff working with older people. Funding has been very elusive for these, which is extremely disappointing, because I firmly believe that often staff act as gatekeepers, seeking to keep the older people away from technology because they are frightened of the consequences of letting them loose on it.

All of these are activities which can turn the tide in the battle to promote technology adoption among older people, and achieve the ultimate goal of breaking down loneliness and isolation. We need to roll these things out more widely and scale them up. If you can help, please let me know.

 

My vision for local, interactive, engaging TV

Merry Christmas. Just in case I don’t see you here again before the big day.

This is a vision. It won’t be popular with a lot of people. And even more will see it as impractical. But, nothing ventured, nothing gained…

I was an early adopter of Cable TV. In the early days of Cable TV in the UK we were promised community-oriented, local programming. It never materialised.

When Jeremy Hunt was Culture Secretary he proposed and funded local TV stations in a number of cities around the country. This would have been a great idea 15 years earlier when Cable TV was in its infancy in the UK. By the time it was introduced the internet, YouTube and cheap live streaming had happened. Jeremy Hunt’s local TV stations still exist, in large part, but they are hidebound by being tied to traditional production methods and expensive studio operations. This makes no sense at all in the second decade of the 21st Century. And those “local” TV stations cover the footprint of TV transmitters, which bear no relation to actual communities. They are far too big. Nobody relates to them.

In this decade there are a large number of people who make a living, some a very good living indeed, out of making YouTube videos. These tend to be “lifestyle”-oriented videos, largely aimed at young people.

My vision is of local, and I mean really local, internet-based “TV” operations using a mix of live and recorded video to keep people in touch with, and active in, their local communities. And these operations will be on the internet, using smartphones and cheap cameras to make their videos. As far as possible, they will encourage and train community members to produce and disseminate their own video content.

Legbourne Annual Fete 2012

I firmly believe that TV is one of the scourges of our age; encouraging people to be inactive, passive consumers of content, products, ideas and world views. For those who have fully embraced the world wide web it is truly an antidote to this, encouraging us to be more proactive, questioning, seeking out information, and creating content. And yes, I still believe this, despite the publicity about whether we all live in our own self-reinforcing social media bubble and about fake news. Making the video content people watch online, engaging, interactive, and relevant to their everyday lives could be transformative. I saw how people’s attention can be grabbed by material which is direct interest to them and their communities when I ran a Digital Christmas Party in Urmston.

This is a big ambition. But all good ideas start from a small base. Who wants to help me make it happen? Please get in touch.

Digital Inclusion – it’s about confidence and capacity; not training

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I’m just back from two great days in East Suffolk delivering digital inclusion sessions in Lowestoft and Felixstowe. These sessions were a pilot for East Suffolk Councils to find out what works before they roll out a wider digital inclusion programme for residents in the districts. I met some lovely people, and, as always I was learning perhaps as much as they were.

As you probably know now, I have a particular approach to digital inclusion which is based on the following principles:

  • Go to where people are, don’t wait for them to come to you;
  • Reasons for using the internet are different. Some can be harder to find than others;
  • No one voluntarily begins using the internet because they want to access Government services;
  • Most people use the internet for fun. The newcomer’s introduction should also be fun;
  • Show people what others do with the internet. They might want to join in;
  • Demonstrate that internet use is a part of “normal”, everyday life.

One thing of particular note which came out of this for me was that a number of people present at the sessions reported that they had had their introduction to new technologies soured by classroom training approaches that tried to teach them content irrelevant to their lives at a pace that left them behind. They found this experience intimidating, confusing, and boring. And it had taken them some time to re-find their interest. The feedback I had from my sessions suggested that they had now turned that corner and were on the road to making digital part of their lives. I think all of us who believe that digital inclusion is vital to people’s health and wellbeing need to raise our voices against all the wasted resources that go into classroom approaches. I am seeing increasing evidence not only that they don’t work, but that they are actually counter-productive.

My time in Suffolk further confirmed to me that the individual nature of each person’s reasons for digital exclusion means that individualised approaches are necessary, and that these approaches need to be patient and long-term. There is no quick fix. We have to remember that digital inclusion work of one kind or another has been going on for 15 years or more. Those who are still not on board are the most resistant, and probably have the most complex issues around why they are not online. These factors have to be unpacked and addressed, sometimes one-at-a-time. And one of the key components of this approach is that people have to be encouraged to love digital enough to want to keep at it, using digital devices and getting fluent with them. I have seen that it is very easy for people to slip back into exclusion if they don’t keep practicing. And they won’t keep practicing if they don’t like what they are doing.

Some of the other interesting issues which emerged from these sessions included:

  • the lady who refused to believe that the product we found on eBay was genuine because it was less than half the price she was used to paying for it in the shops. I think she was eventually convinced by my efforts to show her how to use buyers’ feedback to check whether the seller had a history of offering genuine products (they had almost 99% positive feedback). It is apparent that people who don’t use the internet don’t have a clue about how much money they could be saving if they researched products online;
  • numerous participants who had been subject to scam telephone calls claiming to be from Microsoft or “Windows” and offering to solve computing problems. One participant had actually gone through with the process, but fortunately his daughter had intervened and cancelled his debit card and wiped his laptop before he could lose any money. But even those who had not succumbed said things like “they were so convincing”, “what he said rang true because I had just been given a new computer”, and “but how did he get my number?”. There is a shocking lack of knowledge among digitally excluded people about how randomised computerised systems work. They don’t realise that it is perfectly possible for them to be chosen at complete random by a system that dials millions of numbers a day. They think there has to be a reason why they were chosen for the call. And they don’t understand that a stranger on the end of a phone line cannot possibly have any idea of the state of their computer;
  • quite a few of the participants didn’t have any close relatives alive. This meant that they hadn’t felt the need to learn to use the internet to communicate, they didn’t have family to show them the ropes, and they didn’t have anyone putting pressure on them to join in online conversations;
  • One of the characteristics that many digitally excluded seem to share is a lack of curiosity about life. This is a real barrier to overcome. It means both that they don’t welcome opportunities to learn new things, like how to use the internet, and it is hard to get them excited about the potential for access to the online world to open up new vistas and opportunities for them;
  • The pressures to use online services are getting to the point where some can no longer resist. This was certainly a factor for a number of participants. The trick, from my point of view, is to prevent these pressures from making internet use seem a chore, rather than a pleasure.

All these issues means that we have to stop trying to push people through systems designed around numbers of outputs, listen to their needs, wants and fears, and address them patiently and sympathetically.

Please get in touch if I can help you work with your clients to address similar issues

Dementia-Friendly Group Video-Conferencing?

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Last week I was working at the 2nd North Wales Dementia Meetup (#DementiaNWales). I will blog more about that when I get a chance, and there will be a lot of video content to catch up with soon. But, in the mean time…

I ran a couple of sessions about using technology to make life easier for people with Dementia. In one of the sessions there was an appeal to find a Dementia-friendly group video conferencing app so people can keep in touch with each other.

Personally, I think it must be the case that something suitable already exists. A few months ago I would have confidently said that I think Blab is the one. But then Blab was closed down.

So, is there one that exists, or do we need to invent it? Google Hangouts has been significantly simplified in recent months, but still, when I tried to use it with a group with low levels of digital skills, the majority struggled to access it. Another candidate is HouseParty, an app recently launched by the founders of the demised live streaming app, Meerkat.  Would either of these do the job? Or, of course, there is always Skype, tried and trusted to many now, and offering group video chat as a relatively recent development.

I’d be very interested in people’s views (please leave a comment below) on what the issues are for people with Dementia in accessing group video chat, and whether any of the apps I have suggested might do the job, or does the perfect tool need to be created?

Internet Radio for the Technophopic?

Over the last few months, I’ve met a few people whose older Irish relatives living in the UK are distressed because RTE Radio has ceased broadcasting on Long Wave and can therefore no longer be received in mainland Britain. This has prompted me to restart an investigation I mused about a few years ago.

It is, of course, possible to listen to RTE Radio anywhere in the world via the internet. But with the Irish diaspora, as with many other groups, there is the issue of older people who rely on it but are not capable of making the switch to online listening because they are not comfortable with new technologies. So, is there an option for listening to internet radio that is very easy for someone who is technophobic?  There are a number of standalone internet radio sets, but I have never come across one which is particularly user-friendly (please let me know if I’ve missed one).

So, I have been thinking about a couple of potential options. One is Amazon Echo, which has recently arrived in the UK. This would definitely do the job, as Adrian Scaife of Tunstall Healthcare demonstrated for me when I visited Tunstall’s Mary’s VIP Home back in July. The video of that demonstration is below.

The Echo is a great device, but £150 is a bit pricey for many people. Especially if its main use will be as a radio.

So, another option might be to get a cheap Android phone, some are going for as little as £30 these days, and set it up so that you can use Google Now to voice-activate radio stations through the Tunein Radio app. The issue with this is that you’d probably need to connect it to a decent speaker for it to work effectively, which will add to the cost and make it a bit more complicated. Of course, if the person already has speakers or a hifi system they could plug it into, that might solve the problem. And perhaps if the person has a relative who has upgraded their mobile phone, they could donate their old phone for this purpose.

I’d be interested if anyone has other solutions. This could really help some older people who rely on familiar voices from back home. It would not just be good for people of Irish origins, but for all kinds of other groups as well, and even for people, like myself, who live far away from where they grew up, but might like to listen to local radio from back home.

Any other ideas?

 

Don’t Let Them Tell You The Web is Isolating

Carnegie UK Trust has produced a great piece of work on Digital Participation and Social Justice in Scotland, you can find it here. It a fantastic report, not least because it is short and to the point. It is focused on Scotland, but those of us who work in digital inclusion can see that it applies equally to the other countries of the UK; or anywhere else really.

It is important because it is evidence. And, for me, one of the most striking factors about it is that it demonstrates how people who use the internet are better connected, healthier and more prosperous. The “better connected” thing is worth thinking about. I am really fed up of people who keep telling me that the web and social media are isolating us, making us lose our communication skills, making us stop talking to our friends. When the reality is that its effect is the exact opposite of all those accusations. It brings people together, helps us find new friends, and helps us communicate in new ways. Here is the evidence.

So the next time someone tells you the web is isolating, and they’re the kind of person who wants to see a report before changing their opinion, show them this one.

Addressing the Web Skeptics

Last week I presented at the ARCH (Association of Retained Council Housing) Tenants’ Conference in Leamington Spa. My theme was about Digital Engagement of Tenants. At the beginning of the afternoon workshop, I asked who, in an audience of about 40 people, had never used the internet. 2 men at the back of the room put their hands up, so I told them I hoped I would have convinced them they were missing out by the end of the session.

So, at the close of the workshop, I asked the 2 skeptics if I had changed their minds. One wouldn’t say anything. The other proudly told me he had not changed his view and went on to expound his theory that the internet has stopped people from learning things. That, because people now have information at their finger tips, and access to tools such as spell checks, there is no incentive actually to learn things any more. I explained my view, that having the internet at our disposal encourages us to be more creative, and to use the parts of our brains formerly dedicated to storing information for activities which allow us to deploy our skills and abilities to more effective ends. He wasn’t having it, I’m afraid.

Fortunately, I got a lot of positive feedback from the remainder of those present, and a number of people came forward to tell me I had inspired them to want to use the internet in ways which had not previously occurred to them. But I couldn’t help thinking about those two skeptics and all the things they are missing out on. The truth is the opposite of what that man claimed it to be. Closing one’s mind to the possibilities offered by the web is the ultimate act of refusing to learn. I personally will not rest until I have got everybody to understand that.