27,000 people at a Local Authority Committee Meeting?

At the recent #NotWestminster event I asked if any local authorities were streaming meetings via Facebook. No one present knew of any, and quite a few people there expressed doubts that doing so would be a good idea as they would be fearful of the kind of comments that would come in during meetings.

And then, yesterday, my attention was drawn to a Facebook Live stream of Luton Council’s Development Control meeting, which was actually being done by the local BBC radio station, BBC Three Counties.

Now, this meeting was very high profile, as the main item on the agenda was a proposed development which included the building of a new stadium for Luton Town Football Club. But, nevertheless, it illustrates my point that this is something that local authorities should consider, as the level of engagement during the meeting would be higher than if they continue to stream via self-contained platforms.

Yesterday’s meeting was broadcast in two halves.

Part one is here. At the time of writing this, this video has had more than 19,000 views and attracted 1,655 comments.

Part two is here. At the time of writing this, this video has had more than 27,000 views and attracted 2,936 comments.

Now I know this meeting is a special case. But I still contend that using Facebook Live to stream Council meetings has to be tried as a way of engaging the public in council business. I can help you do this. If you’d like my help, please get in touch.

After all, there aren’t many Council committee rooms that could accommodate 27,000 members of the public.

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Live Streaming as a Fund-Raising Technique?

I don’t want to draw attention to it, so no links, but, did you know that the so-called “Yellow Vests” who have been protesting in pursuit of their aim of a “No Deal” Brexit in London and elsewhere in the UK have been live video streaming all their activities and using their live streams to solicit donations to their cause? As I understand it they have been raising substantial sums for their cause this way, and effectively funding themselves to spend their time on the streets of Westminster and other cities rather than doing another job.

This makes me think. Could we use this technique for a socially useful purposes? What do you think? Any ideas?

On a, slightly un-related note. I came across this video of a live-streaming “factory” in China. This is basically a large house where young women live and work shifts live streaming themselves. As I understand it there is nothing necessarily sexual in this, they effectively offer themselves as friends to lonely people, mainly young men, who are sitting at home in their bedrooms with no one else to talk to. And they make a living out of it. What do you think of this?

While you are here, can I please ask you to take a minute to subscribe to my YouTube Channel here

If you would like to support me to do more of my work in using Digital Storytelling, social media, and video for social good, please consider making a regular contribution via Patreon or perhaps, just buy me a coffee here

 

Lessons from a Connected Christmas

Is it too late to wish you a Merry Christmas? Well, I hope you had a good one.

I’ve been running a number of Connected Christmas events this year using the pretext of a Christmas party to try to turn older people on to the benefits of having new technologies in their lives.

This is always a difficult and challenging task, but I have to admit that this year it appears to have been particularly challenging; and I suspect I won’t do Connected Christmas in quite the same way in future years. I still want to use the opportunity of the approach of Christmas to highlight social isolation and loneliness amongst older people, and the role that new technology can possibly play in addressing this, but I am increasingly coming to the point of view that Connected Christmas needs to be a stage of the process which needs to start much earlier than Christmas.

This year the proportion of people I engage with who say “not interested….  new technologies are not part of my life” is higher than it has ever been in the past. Now I think a lot of it is part of a trend, in that it’s something that has been developing for years now, that the people who are truly digitally excluded are increasingly the hard-core who are super resistant to having new technologies in their lives. It’s not just a question of lack of skills and a lack of interest, it’s an active resistance. And I would like to add a word of congratulations here to the mainstream media. Thank you newspapers, thank you TV and radio stations, you have done a brilliant job of making sure a whole generation is excluded from the Internet. The amount of times I come across the comment that I don’t want anything to do with that because it’s all about fraud, or if I go on the Internet I’m going to get scammed.

But another possibly related issue that I keep coming across is older people who say to me that “that kind of stuff is the bane of my life. My children and my grandchildren are on it all the time and it means I can’t get them to talk to me”.  I try to counter that attitude by saying to people that, if you learn how to use those things yourself and you engage with them, then you will have something in common, you will share interests and you will be able to join in the conversations your family members are having online. I’m struggling to get that message through however, and I am increasingly coming to believe that digital technologies are increasing the generation gap because younger people are immersed in a world that their older relatives are not participating in, and, in many cases the older people are actively resisting opportunities to join in.

I find this frustrating and baffling to a degree. But I don’t think it is unsurmountable. A while ago, I wrote a piece about “Technology-Enabled Nattering” because I believe that what older people really want to do it chat with each other. And when I say “chat”, I mean it in the original sense of the word, not its internet incarnation which involves doing a lot of typing or key-pressing. That’s why I am still looking for funding (anyone, please?) to run some pilot projects which get people talking to each other on a regular basis via video conferencing. And, I want to throw out a challenge here. I think devices like Alexa and Google Home offer the opportunity for social networks to move beyond typing and photographic-based interactions and towards real conversations, involving voices not keyboards. That way older people need no longer be excluded from their younger relatives’ social media interactions. Done right, this approach could mean a real breaking down of the digital divide between the generations. What do you think of this idea, please comment down below.

I hope you have a great New Year. I leave you with a video I recorded just before Christmas, which encapsulates my idea that we should form support groups to crowdfund the purchase of tablets to connect lonely older people to friends and family. What do you think of that idea?

Christmas is the Season of Storytelling

Christmas is the season of storytelling. Of course, it is inspired by what many (not just John Wayne) consider to be the “Greatest Story Ever Told”. In recent years it has been the excuse for retailers and marketeers to role out their best efforts at story telling in the form of their Christmas adverts.

I came across the video below on Linkedin when it was shared by Linda Vernon. It’s a great piece of storytelling by the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists about the benefits of their members’ work, and it’s Christmas-themed. It rings all my bells as telling the stories of the benefits of the work of professionals who provide a vital service to our society.

 

Which brings me to #Brexit. Bit of a stretch, maybe, but bear with me. Yesterday, while making some lunch, I turned the radio on and I heard someone say, “the position on Brexit has changed because there are now so many more facts available”. That is, of course, patently absurd. There are no more facts about Britain’s relationship with the EU now than there were at the time of the Referendum in 2016. What has changed is that more people are aware of the facts, and that awareness, in some cases at least, has made them question the decision they made in 2016. I used to have a job which required me to sit on lots of different EU funding committees. Time-and-time again at these meetings I heard European Commission officials complain that the British partners were failing to meet the requirements to give due publicity to the fact that projects were funded by the European Union. Now I was convinced then, and I am even more convinced now, that this was a deliberate strategy by British governments, of differing political hues, to ensure that they, rather than the EU, were able to take the credit for the investments taking place. Is it any wonder, therefore, that the British public were unaware of the benefits of being part of the EU when they were deliberately obscured from them? And, as we are all too aware, in many cases, the areas which have seen the biggest EU investments are also those which voted most strongly for Brexit.

Stories are important, and the EU Referendum of 2016 was won by those who told the most compelling stories, while those on the other side were mainly those who had been suppressing stories about European successes for decades.

I rest my case about the power of storytelling. If I can help you tell stories about the work you do, please get in touch.

 

Live-streaming: Spreading Important Messages

Ignore the date on the photo (the camera had factory re-set itself)

Last Friday I live-streamed an event in London for charity Compassion in Dying. The event was called “I Wish I Had Known” and it presented findings from the results of assisting more than 25,000 people plan for the end of life.

There were some important messages here about how to ensure people’s wishes about their final days are put into action, and how everyone can have a good death. It certainly stimulated my thinking, and hopefully will have done the same for the 50 or so people in the room, and those watching on the live stream.

This is another example of how live streaming can spread important messages far beyond the room they are expressed in. The live video from the event, which was streamed via Twitter / Periscope is below. Please get in touch if I can help you achieve similar results.

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Engagement Through Live Streaming

I first started live video streaming events in 2010. Have experimented with live streaming as a fun exercise, I was prompted to take it up on a serious basis when a former employer complained about the cost of live streaming an event and I offered to do it for them at a much lower price.

Over the years I have evolved my practice, changed the way I do things, and improved the quality of the output. And I have also operated through a period when live streaming has become mainstream, and a thing that lots of people think they can do. This has resulted in a proliferation of live streams, some of which have been OK in quality, but many more of which have been blurry video with indistinct and/or echoey sound. It takes a lot of effort and some additional equipment to produce a live stream which people are likely to want to watch all the way through, and you can certainly forget it if the sound is poor.

One of the big game-changers on the live-streaming front has been the advent of Facebook Live. In many respects, Facebook Live is just another video platform, but something that makes it unique is that, for those organisations which have built communities on Facebook, whether through Groups or Pages, it adds an opportunity directly to address that community and engage them in events and other work.

Just recently I have live streamed two events for Rethink Mental Illness (formerly the Schizophrenia Foundation). The first event was a panel discussion to mark National Schizophrenia day. To date, the live video has been watched by more than 10,000 people. You can see this one here. And then, yesterday, I live streamed Rethink’s Members’ Day in Sheffield. Only a day later, the video from the morning session has had more than 3,500 views, and the afternoon workshop has over 4,400 views.

And in September, as part of Healthier Lancashire and South Cumbria’s Digital Transformation Programme, I live streamed a Patient Participation Group Meeting for Library House Surgery in Chorley. I think it is safe to say that everyone involved was bowled over by the fact that more than 500 people watched this meeting on the night, and that, within 48 hours that figure had gone up to more than 2,000. This is for a group that regularly attracts an attendance of fewer than 15 people.

To me, these projects have provided powerful evidence of the power of live streaming for social good organisations to engage people in their work. But I think one of the most prominent lessons is the use of live streaming to build on communities already built up on Facebook. Both Rethink Mental Illness and Library House Surgery already had thriving, interactive Facebook communities, and that greatly increased the reach of their live videos. Rethink were able to draw a wide audience into their events, and, for Library House Surgery, the live video drew people in to participate in development of their services who would not otherwise attend meetings.

The public and third sectors are populated with organisations which have missions to engage members or the wider public in their work. Social media and live video streaming, separately or combined together, have amazing potential to draw people into events and other aspects of an organisation’s work. But the live streaming has to be done well. Broadcasting low quality video, particularly if the sound is difficult to hear, could put people off rather than engage them.

I have a mission to use video and social media to help organisations engage with their client groups. One of my specialisms is high quality, but low-priced, live video streaming. I would love to work with more organisations to use live video to engage large audiences in their work. Please get in touch if you would like me to work with you.

The Chancellor’s Announcement About Rural Broadband – Eventually You Get Proved Right

Yesterday the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a further funding programme for rural broadband. This is designed to take faster internet connections deeper into the “difficult to reach” parts of the countryside.

There are two notable things about the proposed strategy here. The first is that it is based on what is called “full-fibre”. That means fibre optic cable right into the premises, not, as has mainly been the case to date, running fibre to street cabinets and then relying on the ancient copper cables to take the signal the rest of the way. This can be for miles in some rural areas, and the signal degrades over copper, whereas it doesn’t over fibre. Some of us have been calling for a “full-fibre” strategy for years, and, at last the Government has caught up with this, but only after wasting millions of pounds on propping up the antiquated copper telephone network.

The second notable element is that the new strategy is based around connecting up public sector buildings, especially schools, to the fibre network, and then connecting up the remainder of the community from there.

In 2011, redoubtable broadband activist Lindsey Annison had a plan identical to this to connect up the community of Warcop in Cumbria. Below are some videos I took on the Fibre Walk she led over the proposed cable-laying route. This plan could not be implemented because we were told that it was not feasible for schools to share the connections with non-educational sites. That policy has now been over-turned, but only 7 years later. How much time and money has been expended in pursuing temporary solutions till now?

It is good to be proved right, but why does it have to take so long?

Connected Christmas 2018

And so, here we are again. It’s time to plan for Connected Christmas 2018.

 

I think this is the fifth year I have done this. We still haven’t solved loneliness among older generations (and this is in spite of recent research which concluded that loneliness was a bigger issue among young people than among older citizens – this is not a reason to ease up on tackling older isolation); and we still haven’t made mainstream the idea that older people can use new technologies to connect with each other and with family, friends, and health and care providers.

These are the reasons why I run Connected Christmas Parties. These are events where older people celebrate Christmas (I am not talking about on Christmas Day here) in the usual way, but part of the mix is that I show them how they might use new technologies to make their lives more connected, more fun and more informed. I do this for a few hundred pounds per event. This does not include the cost of room hire and catering. The events work best where the Connected element “piggy-backs” on an existing event which people are already commited to attend, in a familiar environment.

I hope in the next week or two to be able to announce some exciting news about a plan for a number of Connected Christmas events in Huddersfield and possibly the wider Kirklees District. Watch this space for that. But I want to make Connected Christmas a national, and even international movement, so I would love to run one every day over the Christmas period, and, if its feasible, all over the UK. So please contact me if I can help you run a Connected Christmas event in your area.

It is vital that we get older people more connected to reduce their social isolation, to help them access online services and to benefit from connected health and care services. If you share these objectives, please get in touch and let’s make Connected Christmas a key feature of the forthcoming festive period.

I’ve set up a crowdfunder to help me take Connected Christmas to a wider audience. Please help and share if you can https://www.gofundme.com/connected-christmas-2018

Live-streaming a Patient Participation Group

I am very excited that this Thursday I will be undertaking what I reckon must be a world-first; I’ll be live streaming a Patient Participation Group (PPG). From 6:45pm, the Library House Surgery PPG in Chorley, Lancashire will be live streamed on the surgery’s Facebook Page. I have long been an advocate for live streaming as a means to involve people in the work of public agencies, and I am very pleased to be part of this groundbreaking opportunity to open up the PPG to those who cannot attend meetings.

I am happy to be working with Healthier Lancashire & South Cumbria and Redmoor Health on this initiative.  For any organisations who want to do something similar to engage wider audiences in their work, please get in touch.

Here’s my YouTube video trailing the event.

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Engagement has to be Fun

I present the Bradford Safeguarding Adults Board Community Engagement Event – held on 27th June 2018 at Manningham Mills Community Centre

It was a real privilege to be part of this event. I think the video pretty much captures the essence of the day, which was described to me by one of the participants as “joyous”.

“Joyous?” I hear you ask, “but isn’t Safeguarding a really serious, and potentially scary, issue?”. Safeguarding is certainly serious, but there is a pressing need to make sure it is more widely understood. And it is commendable that Bradford’s Safeguarding Adults Board is committed to making sure that the most vulnerable people in society not only understand the nature of abuse and what can be done about it, but that they can also contribute to the strategy being implemented across the District to keep residents safe. An important element of the Board’s approach is attract people to participate in setting policies and strategy by ensuring that events like this are fun, and genuinely engaging.

So people had a lot of fun at the event, and in amongst the fun, they learnt some really serious stuff; they were provided with tools to deal with abuse in their own lives, they learned about different kinds of abuse, and they contributed to the Safeguarding Adults Board’s strategic plan. And they did all this because they wanted to, not out of a sense of obligation or duty.

I found it particularly encouraging that storytelling was central to much of the message of the day, with a powerful video illustrating a particular kind of abuse, and participants being encouraged to use picture stories to explore issues. This was just one day, but it brought together individual service users and organisations that support their participation on a regular basis. Personally I believe that storytelling, and participation in storymaking, has to be deployed on a wider basis to develop understanding of complex issues and ensure that consultation is genuinely informed via deep understanding of the issues.

I was proud to be part of the day as part of my mission to raise the profile of social care, of the fantastic work so many social care organisations do, and the difference they make to people’s lives. And a key part of the message, which the Safeguarding Adults Board, and other social care organisations in Bradford are central to, is the emphasis on social care being an empowering service which provides the underpinning for people to live full and fulfilled lives in recognition that people know best what is good for them, and the role of professionals is to support them in achieving their personal goals.  In this year when we celebrate the 70th birthday of the NHS, it is vital that we also recognise that the same act gave birth to the modern social care system, and that the two are different sides of the same coin.

There is a playlist of videos illustrating what participants said about the day here, and the presentations and games played on the day are below.