The Chancellor’s Announcement About Rural Broadband – Eventually You Get Proved Right

Yesterday the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a further funding programme for rural broadband. This is designed to take faster internet connections deeper into the “difficult to reach” parts of the countryside.

There are two notable things about the proposed strategy here. The first is that it is based on what is called “full-fibre”. That means fibre optic cable right into the premises, not, as has mainly been the case to date, running fibre to street cabinets and then relying on the ancient copper cables to take the signal the rest of the way. This can be for miles in some rural areas, and the signal degrades over copper, whereas it doesn’t over fibre. Some of us have been calling for a “full-fibre” strategy for years, and, at last the Government has caught up with this, but only after wasting millions of pounds on propping up the antiquated copper telephone network.

The second notable element is that the new strategy is based around connecting up public sector buildings, especially schools, to the fibre network, and then connecting up the remainder of the community from there.

In 2011, redoubtable broadband activist Lindsey Annison had a plan identical to this to connect up the community of Warcop in Cumbria. Below are some videos I took on the Fibre Walk she led over the proposed cable-laying route. This plan could not be implemented because we were told that it was not feasible for schools to share the connections with non-educational sites. That policy has now been over-turned, but only 7 years later. How much time and money has been expended in pursuing temporary solutions till now?

It is good to be proved right, but why does it have to take so long?

Connected Christmas 2018

And so, here we are again. It’s time to plan for Connected Christmas 2018.

 

I think this is the fifth year I have done this. We still haven’t solved loneliness among older generations (and this is in spite of recent research which concluded that loneliness was a bigger issue among young people than among older citizens – this is not a reason to ease up on tackling older isolation); and we still haven’t made mainstream the idea that older people can use new technologies to connect with each other and with family, friends, and health and care providers.

These are the reasons why I run Connected Christmas Parties. These are events where older people celebrate Christmas (I am not talking about on Christmas Day here) in the usual way, but part of the mix is that I show them how they might use new technologies to make their lives more connected, more fun and more informed. I do this for a few hundred pounds per event. This does not include the cost of room hire and catering. The events work best where the Connected element “piggy-backs” on an existing event which people are already commited to attend, in a familiar environment.

I hope in the next week or two to be able to announce some exciting news about a plan for a number of Connected Christmas events in Huddersfield and possibly the wider Kirklees District. Watch this space for that. But I want to make Connected Christmas a national, and even international movement, so I would love to run one every day over the Christmas period, and, if its feasible, all over the UK. So please contact me if I can help you run a Connected Christmas event in your area.

It is vital that we get older people more connected to reduce their social isolation, to help them access online services and to benefit from connected health and care services. If you share these objectives, please get in touch and let’s make Connected Christmas a key feature of the forthcoming festive period.

I’ve set up a crowdfunder to help me take Connected Christmas to a wider audience. Please help and share if you canĀ https://www.gofundme.com/connected-christmas-2018