Technology Overcoming Rural Social Isolation

 

A couple of weeks ago I was working at a fabulous, inspirational event, the World Health Innovation Summit Fylde Coast (#WHISFC18) held at the Winter Gardens (above) in Blackpool. If you are not familiar with the umbrella body, the World Health Innovation Summit, check it out here, but, in summary, it is a rapidly growing movement of healthcare professionals and patients dedicated to putting people in control of improving their own health.

This is the first of a series of blog posts stimulated by the people I met and the initiatives I learned about at #WHISFC18.

Professor Niall Hayes is Professor of Information and Organisation at the University of Lancaster. As I was interviewing him for the video below, I became increasingly excited about what he was saying, as I recognised how it accorded with my own interests and ambitions. As part of an EU-funded project, Niall and colleagues have been developing an app called Mobile Age which aims to overcome social isolation among older people in rural South Cumbria. Here Niall talks about the principles behind this work.

 

I chatted further with Niall over lunch, and then he started to demonstrate the app, so I whipped out my camera and captured his explanation (see video below).

Mobile Age is a social connectedness app. It has been co-created with older residents of South Cumbria. At its core is open data about local events which people can use to plan their itinerary and ensure they can get out and about. It encompasses the ability to add events to a calendar as older people often enjoy constructing an agenda for the week and planning ahead.

Critical to the function of the app is an age-friendly map. This has been designed with clear lines which are more visible than some other mapping systems. The map shows benches, toilets (including available toilets within shops) and bus stops. This allows detailed journey planning to take place, including the ability to plan how to get to and from a venue before darkness falls.

Volunteering and educational opportunities are included, as well as links to vital services.

One of the key elements is the personal profile which allows the settings and itineraries to be saved. It also allows someone working remotely to add items into the profile, meaning that someone more tech savvy who is located distant from the user can help them populate their profile and plan their calendar.

I think this is a great initiative which deserves to be used more widely and replicated for use elsewhere. It epitomises my view that technology can be used to bring people together and to help them interact in the physical world, and that it is in no way de-personalising.

 

Added on 18th July 2018:

In the past couple of weeks I have done some work with the Mobile Age team undertaking video interviews to contribute to the evaluation of the programme.

Also, here is a great explanation of the approach given as part of a news item by ITV Border

 

 

Live-Streaming Comes of Age

 

I’ve been championing live video streaming since I first starting playing with the late, lamented, Qik app in about 2009. I first used it on a BlackBerry, believe it or not, and then moved on to applying it on a Nokia N95 the phone that had remarkably advanced video capabilities for its time and type. I first live-streamed an event professionally in September 2010, and I have gone on to make a specialism of doing good quality, low cost, live-streaming, mainly for non-profit organisations.

I have done this at the lowest possible cost, which has involved using free (or almost free) apps, and budget equipment.

Last week I had enormous fun live streaming the Academic Archers 2018 Conference from the British Library in London. This was a truly joyous event, in which academics with an interest in The Archers long-running radio programme came together to present the results of their research into aspects of the programme. If this sounds a bit dry to you, check out the laughter quotient on my summary video of proceedings.

And I was very pleased, and a little bit proud, that the BBC, both from the Archers twitter account, and from its website was happy to promote and link to my live stream of the event. I started out doing this as cheaply and efficiently as possible, and it is gratifying that a major broadcasting organisation feels my content is of sufficiently quality to be recommended.

If I can help you live-stream an event, and / or provide a cost-effective quality recording. Then please get in touch. The section of the live-stream linked from the BBC website features Charlotte Martin who plays Susan Carter in the programme. I present it below.