My vision for local, interactive, engaging TV

Merry Christmas. Just in case I don’t see you here again before the big day.

This is a vision. It won’t be popular with a lot of people. And even more will see it as impractical. But, nothing ventured, nothing gained…

I was an early adopter of Cable TV. In the early days of Cable TV in the UK we were promised community-oriented, local programming. It never materialised.

When Jeremy Hunt was Culture Secretary he proposed and funded local TV stations in a number of cities around the country. This would have been a great idea 15 years earlier when Cable TV was in its infancy in the UK. By the time it was introduced the internet, YouTube and cheap live streaming had happened. Jeremy Hunt’s local TV stations still exist, in large part, but they are hidebound by being tied to traditional production methods and expensive studio operations. This makes no sense at all in the second decade of the 21st Century. And those “local” TV stations cover the footprint of TV transmitters, which bear no relation to actual communities. They are far too big. Nobody relates to them.

In this decade there are a large number of people who make a living, some a very good living indeed, out of making YouTube videos. These tend to be “lifestyle”-oriented videos, largely aimed at young people.

My vision is of local, and I mean really local, internet-based “TV” operations using a mix of live and recorded video to keep people in touch with, and active in, their local communities. And these operations will be on the internet, using smartphones and cheap cameras to make their videos. As far as possible, they will encourage and train community members to produce and disseminate their own video content.

Legbourne Annual Fete 2012

I firmly believe that TV is one of the scourges of our age; encouraging people to be inactive, passive consumers of content, products, ideas and world views. For those who have fully embraced the world wide web it is truly an antidote to this, encouraging us to be more proactive, questioning, seeking out information, and creating content. And yes, I still believe this, despite the publicity about whether we all live in our own self-reinforcing social media bubble and about fake news. Making the video content people watch online, engaging, interactive, and relevant to their everyday lives could be transformative. I saw how people’s attention can be grabbed by material which is direct interest to them and their communities when I ran a Digital Christmas Party in Urmston.

This is a big ambition. But all good ideas start from a small base. Who wants to help me make it happen? Please get in touch.

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One thought on “My vision for local, interactive, engaging TV

  1. John. Very interested from a grass-roots upwards, identifying natural and key leaders and pro-active networking thought-through community development theory and practice strategues. But why don’t we try and negotiate with Jonathan at theageofnoretirement to take pioneering responsibility for your and our thinking with Tony Phillips at http://www.realife.org.uk, and others, since I gather we are both involved on this front? Including regional options for an organisation still trying, with some success, to break new ground.

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