Digital Storytelling for Health and Wellbeing

Not long before Christmas I had the pleasure of working with Fran O’Hara and Pam Luckock of Working With Not To social reporting and videoing at their Dementia Co-Production event in Llandudno.

It was a truly inspirational event, and I was very glad to play my part in helping people to get their own stories about living with their own Dementia and that of their loved ones out to the wider world. It was a really illuminating day, and it demonstrated that it is a much more effective methodology to get people to tell their own stories rather than giving the floor solely to the opinions of professionals. The material from the day is still in production, but I have taken the opportunity to present some snippets within this post.

I believe that the power of the internet to bring people with similar issues together, and the availability of digital tools to enable people to tell their stories are powerful mechanisms for assisting people to take control of their own health, influence their treatments, and increase understanding of the development of conditions. And it is true that, in some cases, digital inclusion is an issue in this respect as people need to be introduced to the internet and its possibilities, before it becomes a tool to improve their health and wellbeing.

I’ve got previous experience of this when I worked with Clinical Commissioning Groups in South and East Cheshire to collect some patient stories.

There is not enough of this kind of thing happening in my opinion. So I now want to organise a national event on this issue, i.e. Digital Storytelling for Health and Wellbeing. Please contact me (john.popham@johnpopham.com) if you want to be involved in this event, either as a service user, a health and care professional, a storyteller, or a technologist. Let’s build a movement which gets people’s health stories out to the world.

 

Catching up with the Sociable Company

Today I had a long Skype chat with Karen Adams of Express Telephony. You may recall that, a couple of years ago I did some work with the company on its social media strategy.  Two years on, they continue to to deliver a great service to their customers despite the limitations of the inadequate telecoms infrastructure which continues to hold them, and the rest of the country back.

Karen told me that her husband and business partner, Martin, is off to Cornwall shortly to set up the home of a company director with the tools she needs to manage her London-based company remotely. I am intending to work with them to develop a case study of this project as it demonstrates the increasing reality that, in the age of the internet,  location is no longer important to how you do business.

It is frustrating, however, that the country still lacks the infrastructure to realise the full potential of such modern possibilities.

Men in Caring Professions

Our ageing population, plus some other factors, has placed a heavy strain on the UK’s social care system. And it has become increasingly apparent that a particular facet of this strain has been the lack of men prepared to work in frontline caring roles. It is not always the case, but in many instances people prefer to be cared for by somebody of the same gender, especially when that care is intimate in nature.

As you will know, I am passionate about storytelling as a device for influencing behaviour and shedding light on neglected issues. So I have teamed up with the National Care Forum and Skills for Care to begin some work on collecting and disseminating stories from men who work in caring roles. We will be helping them describe what they get out of their work, set out pathways into the professions and progression routes through them, and communicate the reasons why more men are needed in the sector.

Next Monday, January 18th, we will be gathering at Skills for Care’s London office to interview a number of men on camera. If you would like to be part of this day, please get in touch. But there are other ways of collecting stories, and, if you would like to tell your tale, but can’t get there next week, get in touch any way, and I’ll talk to you about other ways you can contribute.

Please help with this worthwhile initiative in whatever way you can.

Growing Old Disgracefully

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, the myth that older people don’t do digital really gets my goat. This is just one of many myths about older people which I struggle to counter in my work on digital inclusion. Many of those myths are not about digital technologies at all, they concern wider aspects of people’s lifestyles and what society deems appropriate for citizens of a certain age.

And sadly, it is all too often the case that individual older people only hit the news when they pass away. One of my childhood heroes, David Bowie has left us, at the age of 69. “Older people don’t do digital” the mantra goes, and yet, as Richard Branson has today reminded us, David Bowie was one of the first artists to release an album for digital download.

This is nothing to do with that album. It just needs to be watched again and again; with the context, that this was 1972.

I don’t really know much about the attitude of Motörhead frontman Lemmy’s attitude to digital technology. But, his funeral was live-streamed on Youtube after he departed, aged 70. And, if you think you have ideas about how Senior Citizens should behave, I’ll leave you with this performance from a 63 year-old Lemmy and friends.