Wifi in Hospitals – Resources Needed

Although we have made significant progress with influencing hospitals to introduce free wifi for patients (I estimate that around 25% of NHS hospitals now have wifi – some of it charged for), there is still a very long way to go; that 75% remaining represents a lot of hospitals, and even where wifi is in place, people still struggle to get online and use it effectively.

The number of visits to this blog which come from people searching for ways to get online in their hospital has convinced me that there is a pressing need for a lot of support in this area. I maintain that there is no argument that having access to the outside world via free wifi is an essential element in patient recovery. That message has failed to get through to many who run NHS hospitals, and it is also clear that the installation of wifi is not enough to solve the problem as many patients still can’t use it due to lack of knowledge on the part of the staff.

The campaign therefore needs resources. We need resources to:

  • get the message through to the remaining 75%;
  • support patients struggling to get online; and
  • run demonstrator projects which prove the benefits to patient recovery.

Anyone got any ideas of where we can get some money?

 

Statistics versus Stories

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Sometimes when I walk the dog in the mornings I just take in the scenery and listen to the birds singing. I am very fortunate to live in an urban area, but to have some great bits of raw nature close to where I live where the dog can be let off the lead to get his exercise.

And, then, sometimes I put the headphones in and listen to Radio 4’s Today Programme to keep up to date with what people are saying about the world.

This morning I did the latter, and caught Anne Atkins speaking on “Thought for the Day”. She posed the question as to why the death of Robin Williams had dominated the news agenda, while the deaths of thousands in genocide in Iraq and from Ebola in West Africa, are dismissed in a few lines. The latter are statistics, she opined, the former is a story that Western people can empathise with.

It reinforces a point I keep making. People who think that reports full of statistics are going to change the world are deluding themselves. If you really want to affect people’s behaviour, and change things, then tell stories about how what you do impacts on people’s lives. People just like you and me. Stories affect people’s emotions and generate empathy. Statistics are just numbers.